Iowa State University researchers find new potential in miscanthus


Nick Fetty | July 29, 2014
A miscanthus field in Japan. Photo via Wikipedia
A miscanthus field in Japan.
Photo via Wikipedia

Researchers at Iowa State University have discovered that Iowa’s soil may help miscanthus – a perennial tall grass – to produce higher yields of biomass than once thought.

Iowa State Agronomists think that this Asian plant will not only provide a source for biomass energy but will also help to protect the environment. The study focused specifically on miscanthus x giganteus, “a sterile hybrid of the plant that cannot reproduce from seed and spreads slowly.”

The study found that this hybrid plant has a low mortality rate even in Iowa’s harsh winters. Agronomists also found that crop yields in the second year were similar to yields in the third year, which is when the plant generally hits its peak production. The full report was published in June in the journal Industrial Crops and Products and additional information about biomass production from miscanthus is also available through the ISU Department of Agronomy.

The University of Iowa has utilized the plant as part of its Biomass Fuel Project which aims to achieve 40 percent renewable energy by 2020. In 2013, 16 acres of miscanthus were planted in Muscatine County and earlier this year an additional 15 acres were planted just south of Iowa City.

2 thoughts on “Iowa State University researchers find new potential in miscanthus

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s