Study predicts more days of extreme heat in the future


Los Angeles' infamous smog is just one example of climate change's effects on public health. (Flickr)
Los Angeles’ infamous smog is just one example of climate change’s effects on public health. (Flickr)
Nick Fetty | September 26, 2014

A University of Wisconsin study has found that the number of extremely hot days in midwestern and eastern U.S. cities is expected to triple by mid-century.

The study – which was published this week in the Journal of the American Medical Association – predicts Milwaukee and New York City will see three times their current average of days that reach 90 degrees of higher by 2050. It also examined the ripple effects that hotter days and the resulting increase of storms would cause on public health. These effects include increased risk for waterborne and other infectious diseases as well as health risks associated with greater air pollution and a more carbon-intensive diet.

To combat these adverse effects on public health, the study suggests a number of measures including: reducing fossil fuel consumption, designing sustainable cities, and eating less meat. The study drew on experts from the studies of public health, air quality, and climate science.

The study cited the 1995 Chicago heat wave which led to more than 700 deaths. Since 1982, extreme heat in Wisconsin has killed more people than all other natural disaster combined. Extreme heat throughout the country has also killed thousands of cattle and other livestock in recent years. Statistics about heat-related fatalities in Iowa were unavailable, however by 2100 Des Moines is estimated to have 85 days with temperatures of 90 degrees or higher and 30 days of 100 degrees or higher.

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