Water polluters spent millions on lobbying efforts in 2014, report finds


The United States Capitol building in Washington, D.C. (Stacy / Flickr)
The United States Capitol building in Washington, D.C. (Stacy / Flickr)
KC McGinnis | February 25, 2015

As the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Army Corps of Engineers look to restore Clean Water Act  protections to smaller waterways around the country, industries and trade groups are putting millions of dollars into lobbying efforts to prevent such a move.

Using publicly available data, environmental advocacy group Environment Iowa found that some of the biggest industrial water polluters also contributed large monetary amounts to lobbying efforts in 2014. The ten companies that dumped the most toxic chemicals into the nation’s waterways in 2012 – a combined 95 million pounds of material – spent more than $53 million on lobbying last year, as well as nearly $10 million in campaign contributions.

At stake is a broader definition of terms like “navigable waters” which are offered protection under the Clean Water Act (CWA). This would include more than two million miles of streams and 20 million acres wetlands which feed into much of America’s drinking water supply. The EPA is currently limited in its enforcement of CWA offenses over the thousands of miles of pipelines stretched over wetlands and waste dumped into smaller streams because of the provisions of current definitions.

The millions spent by companies like Tyson Foods and Kock Industries were used to fund campaign contributions, corporate lobbying and the formation of influential industry groups. Through the hiring of full-time lobbying staff who are able to secure multiple meetings with lawmakers, these companies have an unbalanced level of influence compared to everyday citizens. In 2014, one of these groups, The Waters Advocacy Coalition, sent a letter urging members of the House of Representatives to block the Clean Water Act rule affecting smaller waterways.

Environment Iowa is urging federal officials to “restore Clean Water Act protections to America’s streams and wetlands.” Click here for the full report.

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