CGRER 25th Anniversary Profiles: Rhawn Denniston


Rhawn Denniston is a CGRER members and a professor of geology at Cornell College in Mt. Vernon, Iowa. (Cornell College)
Rhawn Denniston is a CGRER member and a professor of geology at Cornell College in Mount Vernon, Iowa. (Cornell College)

Nick Fetty | August 28, 2015

Rhawn Denniston first got involved with CGRER as a PhD student at the University of Iowa and continues to remain a member now on the faculty at Cornell College. He worked closely with CGRER co-founder Greg Carmichael while at the UI and said the connections he established at CGRER helped to make his current research possible.

“Two of my recent National Science Foundation grants were made possible because CGRER provided me the financial support to perform the preliminary fieldwork and obtain some initial data,” he said. “I published a paper two months ago in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science on the nature and origins of Australian hurricane activity over last two millennia, and CGRER funding was instrumental in getting this project up and running. Similarly, CGRER support has jump-started a project with colleagues from Iowa State on the North Atlantic Oscillation, a major driver of European rainfall variability.”

While many of CGRER’s members come from large research-based universities, Denniston represents a small liberal arts college with approximately 1,100 undergraduate students. He said the partnership between the two institutions helps CGRER to serve as a resource for the entire state of Iowa.

“The connection between CGRER and liberal arts colleges represents a wonderful cross-pollination of ideas and talents,” he said. “By linking and supporting people from a wide array of backgrounds and interests, CGRER acts as an amplifier for environmental research. And because a substantial percentage of students at small liberal arts colleges like Cornell College are Iowans, the work CGRER does with faculty from these institutions enriches the experience of undergraduates outside the U of I.”

This article is part of a series of stories profiling CGRER members in commemoration of the center’s 25th anniversary this October.

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