Citizen Science Workshop this weekend


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Jenna Ladd| October 17, 2017

A citizen science workshop will be held on Saturday, October 21st at the University of Iowa Memorial Union. Hosted by the UI Geoinformatics for Environmental and Energy Modeling and Prediction (GEEMaP) Program, the half-day workshop will provide information about opportunities for Iowa residents to participate in research related to wildlife, water quality, and natural resource management. Dr. Kristine Stepenuck, Extension Assistant Professor of Watershed Science, Policy and Education at the University of Vermont, will be the free event’s keynote speaker.

More information can be found on the event’s Facebook page and the University of Iowa events calendar 

Attendees will be invited to sign up to participate in citizen science projects.

What: Citizen Science Workshop

When: Saturday, October 21, 9:00 am to 12:00 pm

Where: Illinois Room, Iowa Memorial Union, University of Iowa

Cost: Free, open to public

Climate change made California wildfires more severe


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Smoke looms over homes in California during the Solano fire of 2013. (Robert Couse-Baker/flickr)
Jenna Ladd| October 13, 2017

A report published on Thursday in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Technology Review stated that human-induced climate change is likely to blame for the nearly two dozen wildfires ripping across northern California.

The wildfires have burned nearly 190,000 acres so far and killed 31 residents. While the source of the initial flames remains unknown, MIT points out that parts of California recently experienced a five-year drought which was “very likely” caused by climate change. The long drought left more than 100 million dead trees in its wake, which added to the amount of fuel available to this week’s wildfires. Couple that with record-setting heat in California this summer, another consequence of a changing climate, and conditions were perfect for fire.

Climate change is impacting the frequency and intensity of wildfires across the country. Since the 1980’s they’ve become more likely and more severe. According to the Union of Concerned Scientists, wildfires now last five times as long, occur nearly four times as often and burn an average of six times more land area than they used to.

Park Williams, a bioclimatologist at Columbia University, recently published a study looking at the impact of human-induced climate change on the size of the area wildfires have burned the western U.S. Referring to climate change, he said, “No matter how hard we try, the fires are going to keep getting bigger, and the reason is really clear.”

On The Radio – Leaves drop early due to fall drought


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Some leaves in Iowa fell to the ground before changing color this year due to drought. (Liz West/flickr)
Jenna Ladd | October 9, 2017

This week’s On The Radio segment discusses how drought conditions in late September pushed some trees into early dormancy.

Transcript: Tree leaves in Iowa began changing colors and falling to the ground earlier than usual this year due to drought conditions.

This is the Iowa Environmental Focus.

Leaf color change is closely tied to weather conditions. During the last week of September, the U.S. Drought Portal reported that about thirty percent of Iowa was experiencing abnormally dry conditions and about twenty-five percent of the state was in a moderate drought.

Officials from the Iowa Department of Natural Resources explained that if trees do not have enough moisture, they can be pushed into dormancy earlier than usual. As a result, many leaves died and fell from trees before they bursted into autumn’s hues of red, yellow and orange this year.

In a typical year, leaves change color in northern Iowa between the last week of September and the second week of October, from the first to third weeks of October in central Iowa and from the second to fourth weeks of October in southern Iowa.

For more information, visit iowa-environmental-focus-dot-org.

From the UI Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research, I’m Betsy Stone.

Earlier spring could threaten bees


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The new study looked at three bee species in the Rocky Mountain region. (CL Baker/flickr)
Jenna Ladd | October 5, 2017

A new study has found that longer spring seasons associated with climate change may be harmful to certain bee populations.

Researchers focused on a region in the Colorado Rocky mountain range and three species of bees. Using 40 years of climate and flower data collected by David Inouye, a professor emeritus at the University of Maryland, College Park, the report concludes that mountain snow in the area is melting earlier than it used to, resulting in longer spring seasons with longer growing seasons for flowers. Somewhat surprisingly, there has been an increase of total number of days with low flower availability since spring began getting longer.

One of the study’s co-authors, Rebecca Irwin of North Carolina State University, said to the Scientific American, “Years that have a lot of days with low floral abundance seem to be years that have really low snowfall and early snowmelt.”

The study points out that when flowers emerge too early, they are susceptible to early spring frosts which can kill some of them off. Additionally, if snow melt begins flowing down mountain sides too early in the spring, there can be drought conditions later in the summer when it runs out.

It was found that years with a lot of low floral abundance days also had lower bee populations. The scientists write, “Our study suggests that climate-driven alterations in floral resource phenology can play a critical role in governing bee population responses to global change.”

Alliant energy offers trees at significant discounts to costumers


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Maple trees make up one-third of all trees in Iowa, making them more susceptible to disease and pest problems. (Dee McIntyre/flickr)
Jenna Ladd | October 4, 2017

Alliant Energy’s Operation ReLeaf tree distribution program will continue this week and into October. During this time, the company provides landscape-quality trees to their customers at a significant discount. Thoughtful placement of trees can cut energy costs for homeowners by providing shade in the warmer months and wind blocks during colder months.

Customers can buys trees that typically retail for $65 to $125 for just $25 each. Residential tree distributions will be held in Buena Vista, Fayette, Lee, Linn, Lucas and Story counties this October.

The Iowa Department of Natural Resources provides several resources for homeowners looking to select the appropriate tree for their yards. In one of the DNR’s publications, “Rethinking Maple: Selecting Trees For Your Yard,” officials point out that maple trees make up more than one-third of all trees in Iowa, which increases their risk for disease and pest problems. The pamphlet encourages homeowners to consider other tree species based on desired qualities such like vibrant fall color, storm resistant, salt tolerant and others.

Trees will be distributed on a first-come, first-serve basis at the following locations on the following dates:

Buena Vista County – Storm Lake

Partner: City of Storm Lake

Location: Kings Point Park

Date: Oct. 4, 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m.

Lee County – Montrose

Partner: Lee County Conservation

Location: Lee County Conservation Center

Date: Oct. 5, 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.

Tree planting and care workshop: 5:45 p.m.

Linn County – Marion

Partner:  Linn County Conservation Board

Location:  Squaw Creek Park

Date: Oct. 7, 7:30 a.m. to 9 a.m.

Tree planting and care workshop:  8:15 a.m.

Story County – Ames

Partner: Story County Conservation

Location: East Petersen Park

Date: Oct. 19, 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m.

Tree planting and care workshop: 5:15 p.m.

Iowa Environmental Council annual conference this week


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This year’s Iowa Environmental Council conference will be held at the FFA Enrichment Center in Ankeny, Iowa. (FFA Enrichment Center)
Jenna Ladd | October 3, 2017

The Iowa Environmental Council will hold its annual conference this Thursday, October 5th at a Des Moines Area Community College facility in Ankeny. Titled “ACT Iowa: Local Solutions for a Healthier Environment,” the conference will discuss solutions to pressing environmental problems.

The all-day event will include several break-out sessions with topics ranging from watershed management and sustainable housing to local food systems and environmental advocacy. The conference will welcome Nicolette Hahn Niman, livestock rancher, attorney and author, as its keynote speaker. Hahn Niman has published two books related to sustainable meat production and written several pieces for the New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and the LA Times.

The Iowa Environmental Council is the largest environmental coalition in the state, serving as a nonpartisan group working to promote clean water and land stewardship, clean energy, and a healthy climate.

Individuals interested in registering for the event can do so here.

What: ACT Iowa: Local Solutions for a Healthier Environment, hosted by the Iowa Environmental Council

When: October 5th, 2017 from 8 am to 5 pm

Where: DMACC FFA Enrichment Center,1055 SW Prairie Trail Pkwy, Ankeny, IA 50023

Leaves drop early due to fall drought


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Vibrant fall leaf colors may be missing in some parts of Iowa this year due to drought conditions. (Ashley Webb/flickr)
Jenna Ladd | September 26, 2017

Tree leaves in Iowa began changing colors and falling to the ground earlier than usual this year due to drought conditions.

Leaf color change has a lot to do with weather conditions, according to the Iowa Department of Natural Resources. The U.S. Drought Portal reveals that about thirty percent of Iowa is currently seeing abnormally dry conditions and about twenty-five percent of the state is experiencing moderate drought.

Kandyce Weigel is the administrative assistant of the Iowa Department of Natural Resources’ State Forest Nursery. She told the Des Moines Register, “When they (trees) don’t have enough moisture, they’ll start to go into dormancy. They need moisture and they need cool nights. And usually, the light change — when we have less light as the days get shorter — that cues them to change, too. But that dryness is cuing them to push into dormancy earlier.”

In a typical year, leaves change color in northern Iowa between the last week of September and the second week of October, from the first to third weeks of October in central Iowa and from the second week through the end of October in southern Iowa.

Unfortunately, dry conditions cause leaves to die and fall from trees before they burst into autumn’s hues of red, yellow and orange.