Iowa Environmental Council annual conference this week


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This year’s Iowa Environmental Council conference will be held at the FFA Enrichment Center in Ankeny, Iowa. (FFA Enrichment Center)
Jenna Ladd | October 3, 2017

The Iowa Environmental Council will hold its annual conference this Thursday, October 5th at a Des Moines Area Community College facility in Ankeny. Titled “ACT Iowa: Local Solutions for a Healthier Environment,” the conference will discuss solutions to pressing environmental problems.

The all-day event will include several break-out sessions with topics ranging from watershed management and sustainable housing to local food systems and environmental advocacy. The conference will welcome Nicolette Hahn Niman, livestock rancher, attorney and author, as its keynote speaker. Hahn Niman has published two books related to sustainable meat production and written several pieces for the New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and the LA Times.

The Iowa Environmental Council is the largest environmental coalition in the state, serving as a nonpartisan group working to promote clean water and land stewardship, clean energy, and a healthy climate.

Individuals interested in registering for the event can do so here.

What: ACT Iowa: Local Solutions for a Healthier Environment, hosted by the Iowa Environmental Council

When: October 5th, 2017 from 8 am to 5 pm

Where: DMACC FFA Enrichment Center,1055 SW Prairie Trail Pkwy, Ankeny, IA 50023

Trump eliminates climate change advisory panel


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The White House has moved to dissolve its panel on climate change, despite the fact that temperatures in recent decades were higher than they have been in 1,500 years. (Michael Vadon/flickr)
Jenna Ladd| August 22, 2017

The Trump administration announced on Friday that it will terminate the U.S. climate change advisory panel.

The panel, called the Advisory Committee for the Sustained National Climate Assessment, was established two years ago by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The group is tasked with producing a National Climate Assessment every four years and working with policymakers and business leaders to interpret the report’s findings and act accordingly. Its fifteen members included scientists, local officials and business representatives.

The charter for the panel expired Sunday after NOAA administrator Ben Friedman announced that the Trump administration had decided to dissolve the group. The next National Climate Assessment was due to be released this spring.

A major component of the spring 2018 assessment called the Climate Science Special Report is currently under review at the White House. The report, which was written by scientists from thirteen separate institutions, states that human activity is responsible for steadily rising global temperatures from 1951 to 2010.

This report has not yet been approved by the Trump administration.

Candidates ignore climate change in policy debates


Photo by World Economic Forum

Jon Huntsman threw himself into the GOP race for the presidential nomination today – a race that is becoming less and less concerned with environmental issues.

National Public Radio reports:

Former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman formally kicks off his presidential campaign Tuesday, with New York’s Statue of Liberty as a backdrop. He’s hoping some tired and poor Republicans are yearning for a different kind of candidate. Huntsman holds moderate views on immigration and same-sex civil unions, and he wasn’t afraid to serve in the Obama administration, as U.S. ambassador to China.

As governor, Huntsman was also a leader in a regional effort to control greenhouse gases, by capping carbon emissions and trading pollution permits.

“Until we put a value on carbon, we’re never going to be able to get serious about dealing with climate change,” Huntsman said during a 2008 gubernatorial debate.

Since then, the political climate has changed.

“Our economy’s in a different place,” Huntsman told Time magazine last month. “The bottom fell out of the economy, and until it comes back, this isn’t the moment” to pursue cap and trade. Continue reading