On The Radio – Pace of sea level rise tripled since 1990


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A new study found that sea levels are rising nearly three times faster than in previous centuries. (Chris Dodd/flickr)
Jenna Ladd| June 12, 2017

This week’s On The Radio segment discusses a recent study that found sea levels are rising at a significantly faster rate than in the past. 

Transcript: Scientists, in a new study, have found that the Earth’s oceans are rising nearly three times as quickly as they were throughout most of the 20th century.

This is the Iowa Environmental Focus.

This new finding is one of the strongest indications yet that a much-feared trend of not just sea level rise, but its acceleration, is now underway.

Their paper, published in May’s Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, isn’t the first to find that the rate of rising seas is itself increasing — but it finds a bigger rate of increase than in past studies.

The new paper concludes that before 1990, oceans were rising at about almost a half an inch per decade. From 1993 through 2012, though, it finds they rose by almost one and a quarter inches per decade.

To learn more about the study, visit iowaenvironmentalfocus.org.

From the UI Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research, I’m Betsy Stone.

IPCC issues 2014 Climate Change Report


Copyright: © Belspo / Nevens
Copyright: © Belspo / Nevens

This year’s climate change report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change warns that the impacts from climate change are already occurring.

With over 300 authors from 70 countries, this report is a worldwide scientific collaboration. They state that world leaders have a limited time to reduce carbon emissions to avoid disastrous warming.

Major impacts from climate change include sea level rise, large-scale shifts in temperatures that would disrupt human life and natural ecosystems, increased diseases, and decreased or disrupted food production or food quality.

The authors argue that today’s governments are not prepared for the consequences of climate change, and stress how today’s actions determine our future.

View the full report here.

Opinions, reactions, and summaries of the report can be found at The New York Times, USA Today, or The LA Times, among many others.